Light Fairytale is the indie RPG that will make me go back to RPGs

I’ve had a love/hate relationship with RPGs in the past. I enjoy the worlds and story lines but I get frustrated with random battles and incomprehensible turn-based fighting. Let me emphasize, this is a personal fault and not necessarily the fault of any one game. I had no idea that Light Fairytale was a turned-based RPG (because I forgot to read the description). I just downloaded the demo from Game Jolt because it had the word “Fairytale” in the title. In my real life, fairy tales are kind of my thing.

A mysterious girl is hinted at in the opening scenes. How she fits into the story? We’ll see.

However, I was so impressed with this short demo that I’m starting to question why I’ve stayed away from RPGs for so long. Light Fairytale is adorable, but also beautifully designed. I was particularly impressed with the atmosphere and backgrounds. For a one-developer operation, the quality is top-notch.

I particularly like the lighting in this screen shot.

The characters — Haru and Kuroneko — interact with each other and the few NPCs you encounter quite naturally. No heavy-handed dialog, no exposition dumps, just normal conversation fitting with each situation. The life of Haru and those around them and the mystery hinted at in the opening scenes tease what I hope will be an interesting story, and I’m looking forward to seeing more.

If you don’t know which enemy to target first, you weren’t paying attention.

Light Fairytale hosts a truly helpful hint system — a feature that other games seem to lack. Not only does the system remind you of the keyboard commands, but highlights NPCs you still need to interact with and the possible pathways out of your current area. I can’t emphasize how helpful this was as the 3D angle of the environment made finding pathways a little difficult. But this is early access.

I’m keeping Light Fairytale on my watch list and am excited to dive into a fuller game this fall (according to the web site).

Fairy Tale Mysteries restores most of my faith in the genre

After my less-than-lovely review of Forgotten Fairy Tales, I wanted to give the casual game developer community another try and downloaded another title in the genre: Fairy Tale Mysteries: The Puppet Thief. Originally released in 2012 by Gogii games, Fairy Tale Mysteries succeeds in nearly all the areas where the newer game fails. The voice acting is convincing and committed. The graphics are dense, but not overwhelming. And the puzzles are not the kind that insult the intelligence of the average, or not-so-average, casual gamer.

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There is a fine line between too much direction in a game, and not enough. I pondered this furnace for a while.

As I played, it felt familiar, not in game play – these kind of games rarely break out of their molds – but in atmosphere and imagery and it’s quite possible that I played through the demo when it first game out. And while I think Fairy Tale Mysteries is an example of how good voice acting and story direction can elevate what would otherwise be a mundane HOG adventure game, I’m curious why I didn’t purchase it back then.

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Puzzle of this type can get annoying quickly, but, if they’re visually stunning, I don’t mind.

The downside of playing a lot of these games is that aforementioned lack of “break out.” Even though I’ll continue playing and reviewing them, perhaps this genre is in need of a break away disrupter. Year after year, the HOG adventures may shift a little here, add a feature there, but they continue on with the same, old game mechanics and tired themes. Perhaps there is a philosophy that developers shouldn’t deviate from a formula that clearly works. But for how long? I also began reviewing smaller, independent games on this site and I am much more optimistic of finding something new and interesting there.

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Nothing good ever comes about with a group of torch-wielding peasants.

Ultimately, while I would definitely recommend trying out this older title, Fairy Tale Mysteries: The Puppet Thief lacks a few features prominent in later HOG adventures: a map for navigation between areas, and an annoyingly hiding inventory area. If you can cast your game playing hands back a few years, these two missing mechanics won’t bother you too much, mainly because you’ll be so impressed that, at least at one time, a game developer cared about the voice acting in a HOG adventure game.

 

Forget you, Forgotten Fairy Tales, forget you

Full disclosure: I’ve studied fairy tales. Wrote my Master’s thesis on fairy tales. So when I downloaded the second game in the Forgotten Fairy Tales Series, I was a little curious as to what kind of stories were going to be featured. How would the game makers approach different folklore? Would the stories be mostly European in origin or would they plum the depths of our collective human creativity and reach beyond Perrault and the Grimms?

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These are actually my hands, in the game, trying to hold this nonsense at bay.

Boy, those questions were a waste of time. So was this demo of The Forgotten Fairy Tales: Canvases of Time. The story line bored me from the moment is started, sprinkled with “Alice Carpenter’s” stilted and far-too-cheerful voice acting: “Hello Queen of Creation,” she says like she’s running late for a fucking parent-teacher conference. The villain hisses and gargles his dialog like he’s woken up with a case of pebble-throat, and the elf goes from high-pitched crying to some butter-smooth cooing. “You saved me a second time…” I shuddered. Blech.

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Fiverr, probably.

The game play is your standard find, collect, walk back-and-forth, match, blah. The only interesting moments come from reanimating the golem – the least stony of all the acting – and creating a new lens through the magic of smeltery! The game’s protagonist, Alice Carpenter, is a folklore lecturer and, since she’s currently trapped in some Biff Tannen alternate fairy tale timeline, I’ll be more than happy to take over her classes.

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“Welcome to the Biff Tannen Museum! Dedicated to Hill Valley’s #1 Citizen. And America’s greatest living folk hero. The one and only Biff Tannen.”

Assignment number one: 289 words on why this is a bad game.